On her debut self-titled album, Bishop Briggs exposes the different sides of toxic relationships by merging the dark tones of several genres. Sara Grace McLaughlin (aka Briggs) is currently on tour  in the United States, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. 

Briggs infuses the darker elements of soul, indie, alternative and electric genres into her music. The artist’s lyrics are mysterious, convincing the listener to interpret the meaning on their own.

“Acting like I’m heartless / Acting like I’m fine / That don’t mean I’m scarless / That don’t mean I’m fine,” — it instantly reminded me of fellow indie artist, Lana Del Rey because of the similarities in their lyrics. In “Dark Paradise,” Del Rey sings about love and loneliness. Because of the somber themes, the tracks bring out similar emotions of sorrow and devotion.

Compared to Del Rey, Briggs takes on a more demonic tone towards her lyrics and love life. In “Dark Side,” Briggs makes it sound like love is painful not only for her, but her significant other. As she sings “Oh, I drain your life ’til there’s nothing left but your bloodshot eyes,” Briggs pairs the lyrics with equally dramatic instrumentals.

“River” showcases how she would rather die than be torn away from her lover, but the two being separated is inevitable. Briggs delivers strong vocals which drew me in, unlike her other songs. She assertively yells the lyrics with passion during the chorus, and toned down in the background are deep clapping drum noises, similar to that of Hozier. This proved to be my favorite of the six songs because of its catchy tune and easy to remember lyrics.

Although her voice can be powerful, her vocal range is limited so instead she raises her voice rather than adjusting her tone and pitch. However, the new artist picks up the tempo in each song by speeding up the pace through the instrumentals.

This isn’t the perfect album to listen to while doing homework or sipping a cup of coffee, but this is the perfect album to scream at the top of your lungs when emotions are overwhelming. The musical journey is just starting for Briggs and her edgy style. I’m interested to see how the artist will advance and evolve, and if she will possibly capitalize just on one genre.

Do you like 'genre bender' music?