Cooking food in large batches can be the solution to the reluctance to cook new food.
Photo Credit: Alex Nedelcu

“If you weren’t on your phone so much I think you would know how to build a house by now.”

If I had a dollar every time my dad said a variation of that phrase, there would be enough money available to purchase a beachfront property for him just to not hear those words again. However, the more that quote is drilled into my head, the more I realize that my dad’s words make sense.

Even without having social media, I constantly find myself being distracted by technology. Whether the distraction comes from Reddit or Crossy Road, wasted minutes become wasted hours while other activities that can prove to be beneficial lay bruised and neglected.

Learning how to do an everyday activity, like cooking and ironing, does not seem to be as amusing or entertaining as Twitter can prove to be, yet will be of infinitely more use to a teen than any form of distraction a website or app can offer. In most cases, completing these tasks can take away less time than surfing the Internet for a black hole that will readily absorb anyone’s time.

[vision_pullquote style=”1″ align=””] Yard work, cleaning and cooking are all very real tasks that a person has to practice to master, practice that is not currently being perfected by the vast majority of teenagers. [/vision_pullquote]

While I would be making a hasty generalization by saying that no teenagers know how to cook (which is not true at all, some make pretty decent chefs), I could safely say that more people tell me they do not know how to cook, with one particularly sad culinary confession being “I don’t even know how to make an egg.” Having a melancholy feeling towards preparing food is completely unnecessary, since there is abundance of recipes for simple, easy-to-make food that is filling and cheap to produce.

Refusing to learn how to cook or do similar tasks often stems from the flawed thought of “Why do something if I have my parents to do it for me?” What would be the point of learning how to do an oil change if driving is a lifetime away, or learning how to properly fold clothes when clothes hangers exist to counter the terrors of folding? Preparing for the future is a must, and being well-versed with both technical and blue-collar work can open doors all over the place.

The reason parents try to teach their kids these evidently “simple” tasks during their teenage years is to prepare them for a life away from the family home. Yard work, cleaning and cooking are all very real tasks that a person has to practice to master, practice that is not currently being perfected by the vast majority of teenagers.

These claims are not even far fetched, as many students (about 23% of them) now entering the college world are not even able to make a bed without assistance. Learning these basic sills are highly beneficial to anyone, and starting earlier can create less stress for the average teen. In addition to knowing how to do a basic task, teens can avoid the embarrassment of asking one of their friends or roommates with help making their bed.

Staying away from the gravitational pull of technology is a must if one wishes to be well-rounded in many aspects of their life. Fun little websites and games are great for eating up time, but are not very beneficial when the user is looking for a fulfilling meal.