Chemistry students conduct chemical reaction experiments

Sophomore Theo Buna performs his lab experiment involving a chemical reaction in class on Sept. 9. His group chose to perform the dry ice bubble experiment. "I thought that this project was a lot of fun to do and I really liked my specific project," Buna said.
Photo Credit: Nikki Molina
Sophomore Theo Buna performs his lab experiment involving a chemical reaction in class on Sept. 9. His group chose to perform the dry ice bubble experiment. "I thought that this project was a lot of fun to do and I really liked my specific project," Buna said.  Photo Credit: Nikki Molina
Sophomore Theo Buna performs the dry ice bubble lab on Sept. 9. Students were able to choose any lab involving a chemical reaction. “Even though it took four times to get it right during my presentation, I thought that this project was a lot of fun to do and I really liked my specific project,” Buna said.
Photo Credit: Nikki Molina

The sophomores in Mrs. Emily Shield’s chemistry course conducted lab experiments of their choice to showcase their understanding of proper lab safety and scientific procedures.

“This lab was heavily based on the procedures and what happens before the experiment rather than the actual presentation,” sophomore Sheena Wakisaka said.

Labs chosen by the students included the dry ice bubbleburning magnesium in dry icecolored firehydrogen balloon and more. In groups of three to four, they were required to perform and present in front of their peers in an informal fashion without relying on PowerPoints or posters.

“I gave them the freedom to choose their own lab because I wanted my students to be interested in chemistry,” Mrs. Shields said.

The students were expected to follow safety lab requirements to demonstrate their attained knowledge from previous class lessons. Learning to conduct their own experiments allowed them to experience chemical reactions first-hand.

“The students have to write lab procedures with every lab they do and it’s best that they learn it now, so that they’re comfortable with every lab from here on out,” Shields said.