To practice identifying parts of a computer, Robotics and Information Technology teacher Wayne Davies required Information Technology students to dismantle computers and reconstruct them.

“The purpose of the assignment is supposed to allow students to identify and understand components of a computer,” Davies said. “Computers and electronics are used everyday in jobs, and there aren’t many jobs that don’t use [them].”

Before they were allowed in the engineering shop, IT spent over a month researching parts of a computer and were tested on safety procedures such as using a fire extinguisher. They had to earn a passing score of 70% or higher.

“This activity was interesting and practical as it lets you get the IT certification and allows you to fix computers for your friends and family,” junior Jimson Huang said.

Students logged their work on a document throughout the assignment proving they deconstructed the computers correctly. Throughout the assignment, questions were answered in relation to the parts, whether it be the type of connector used or the number of pins. 

“The overall goal is for [students] to gain base knowledge of how the electronics works, [so] they are prepared for the workforce,” Davies said.

Working in groups of four, students worked for two class periods to completely dismantle and reconstructs computers, which were donated by another school.

“I think it’s a really great project just understanding how everything in the computer works and how there are very specific components,” junior Paul Yu said. “Not only that but it’s [an enjoyable] project and we haven’t had one of those in awhile.”

Do you think taking apart a computer is a good way to learn?