World History students explore Latin American revolutions

Sophomores in the Argentinian Revolution group, Sarah Kim, Mallory Gruber, YouJia Shi, Aubrey Deloe, and Sabrina Lightfoot elaborate on significant figures that took part in the revolution.
Photo Credit: Shantil Gamiao
Sophomores in the Argentinian Revolution group, Sarah Kim, Mallory Gruber, YouJia Shi, Aubrey Deloe, and Sabrina Lightfoot elaborate on significant figures <br />that took part in the revolution.<br>Photo Credit: Shantil Gamiao
Sophomores in the Argentinian Revolution group, Sarah Kim, Mallory Gruber, YouJia Shi, Aubrey Deloe, and Sabrina Lightfoot elaborate on significant figures
that took part in the revolution.
Photo Credit: Shantil Gamiao

Presentations for Latin American revolutions took place on Feb. 7 and 8 for all honors and regular World History classes that have Ms. Krista Boivie. The students showcased their multimedia presentations to the class, along with other information they researched.

“Being in a group of four people and having 12 important aspects to research, we all divided the work equally and plugged the information into our Google PowerPoint. The presentations were extremely easy.” sophomore Brandon Guerrero said.

The students were required to memorize what they were going to say for their presentation on their Latin American revolution and make eye contact with the audience, rather than reading off the slides or their notecards. Presentations usually took about 3-8 minutes per group.

“The presentations were rather casual since we didn’t have to dress professionally and it was rather easy thanks to the casualness of it all. I hope we have more group assignments as easy as this,” sophomore Mallory Gruber said.

Each group of students were assigned one of the five Latin American revolutions: Haitian, Brazilian, Venezuelan, Mexican, or Argentinian and had a week to research about that country’s revolution.

“I assigned this activity in order for students to physically interact with each other and thoroughly research their country’s revolution. This assignment is much more easy to remember and absorb if students were to present the information to each other rather than watching videos and listening to podcasts made by me,” Boivie said.