Students aim to lessen daily workload by enrolling in new guidance elective With teachers as mentors, students will get up-to-date on classwork, as well as receive help on school-related questions

Working on her MATH 126 equations, junior Gabrielle Bagtas starts her homework early. With the new Guidance elective, students have the ability to catch up on their studies. “Guidance is like a ‘study hall’,” Bagtas said. “I like how for an hour, I can just become relaxed and focus on one specific assignment at a time so I don’t become overwhelmed.” Photo Credit: Gabrielle Bagtas

Focused on providing students with real-life skills, Guidance offers sophomores, juniors and seniors with knowledge in organization, time management and problem-solving.

“I’m excited about this class because it gives me time to de-stress from the workload that junior year will put me through,” junior Sergio Sison said, “[So far,] my first period of Guidance felt very welcoming so I enjoyed it.”

Each teacher has the choice to conduct the class how they choose. For Interior Design and Guidance teacher Shannon Sheldon, she will have a specific routine from start to finish. 

“I will share a tip or teach a trick on test-taking or [how to] manage a massive amount of emails,” Sheldon said. “[I also plan to] meet one on one with students in a break out room to see how I can individually assist them to be successful.” 

Along with Sheldon, fellow Guidance teachers are required to send out weekly wellness checks for their students. Doing so allows the teachers to gain a better chance of getting to know each individual.

“With it being my last year, I really want to make sure that I can get my GPA up as high as possible and do my absolute best in school,” senior Ramuel Tibayan said. “I have a bad habit of procrastinating, so I think that guidance will really help me with having dedicated time to do any work that originally would’ve drained my energy at home.”

Many teachers hope that this class helps students stay on track for graduation, but also manage their stress levels while juggling this new method of learning. 

“I’m trying to keep it very relaxed and calm,”  Automotive and Guidance teacher Bertrand Potts said. “With Google Meets Plus, [my students] have the opportunity to do trivia, but if you have other work to do, and you don’t need this distraction, then students are allowed to do so. I just don’t want to add anything else to a [student’s] workload.”

If you didn’t take guidance this year, do you wish you had?