New cafeteria app launches, additional features in development See what's for lunch before the school day starts

Cafeteria worker Julian Morras serves sophomore Adamaris Magdaleno breakfast inside of the lunchroom. Students can preview what is going to be served on Nutrislice."The students can be informed about the food that they're eating and not worry about problems with whatever allergies they have in advance," Magdaleno said. Photo Credit: Jasmine Bobbins

Giving parents, students and staff an easier way to view what’s for breakfast and lunch at school, Clark County School District launched a new mobile app called Nutrislice, an online cafeteria menu.

“This gives the users of Nutrislice a hands-on perspective on what’s going to be served on specific school days with the images and the facts,” Kitchen Manager Rosie Hernandez said. “This would really help out parents with knowing what their child is going to eat for the day.”

Aside from presenting the day’s cafeteria menu, Nutrislice also provides allergen information to alert parents in case their child has any dietary restrictions. Ingredients and nutrition facts can be found for main courses, sides and beverages.

“I think that a calorie tracker should be added to this app because people with diets can use this app as a resource and still keep their eating habits on track,” junior Kailee Tugaoen said.

The cafeteria menu of any CCSD-affiliated school can be found in Nutrislice. If parents have students who attend different schools, they can view the menus all at once.

“For the most part, I have gotten used to bringing my own food or going to student store for lunch because I’m not sure if I will be able to buy food that I can eat from the cafeteria,” junior Stefanos Bingham said.”I feel like it would also be extremely helpful even for those who can eat meat but are trying to eat healthier.”

Due to recent budget cuts, the app is limited to only showcasing the cafeteria menu and the foods’ nutritional facts and ingredients. Once the district earns more money to fund the app, the developers can add new features such as pre-ordering meals and filtering out specific ingredients.

“We don’t have the technology of ordering online with the budget that CCSD Food Service has implemented on the schools,” Hernandez said. “Now they are still trying to figure out budget cuts for teachers. If they had the money, ordering food from school through vendors would happen.”

[poller_master poll_id=”686″ extra_class=””]