Web Design group impresses judges panel at CES Awarded second place at Future Innovators competition

After learning that had placed second, seniors Anish Chejarla, Elizabeth Wigington, and Ishaan Raja celebrate their victory at the CES Future Innovators competition. The three of them competed with 19 other teams in the district at the business pitch contest. “Our service was incredibly well thought out and realistic, and all three of us could speak confidently,” Wigington said. Photo Credit: Denise Snow

Presenting their business pitch against other schools in the valley, the three-person group was awarded second place in the final round of the CES Future Innovators competition sponsored by Everfi.

“I am very proud,” Web Design teacher Denise Snow said. “They had the best professional presentation, and the judges were really blown away by that. All three of them have had plenty of public speaking [practice] throughout the web design program, and they’ve studied finance on their own.”

Groups of three created four to five-minute business pitches for a product or service to attract hypothetical investors. Students were tasked with coming up with an innovative idea, and a marketing and financing strategy.

“We did incredibly well,” senior Elizabeth Wigington said. “We had a strong pitch and understanding of our DNA as a company and answered the judges’ questions professionally.”

19 teams, each consisting of three members, competed at the CES Future Innovators competition. Investors voted on which teams would move forward in the competition. The group’s pitch was for a company named “bitLoop” that Chejarla and Raja have been working on for the past six months. The project is a full-on private tutoring source for computer programming.

“We were the only team whose business idea was not hypothetical, and was something we’re doing right now,” Chejarla said.

Current Web Design freshmen, sophomores and juniors can prepare for next year’s competition now.

“I would recommend (future competitors) to try it out to not only make a unique product but to explore the world of economics and clients,” Wigington said. “It’s a great doorway to seeing how your designs can affect people.”